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Web de Anza

 

School Name

Catalina High School, Tucson, Arizona

Teacher Name

Naomi E. Estrada-Weber and Mr. Berrellez

Grade

 

Unit Name

 Spanish Through History - Web de Anza

Lesson Name

Lesson 1: Using Technology To Learn About The Anza Expedition

Lesson 2: Using Scholars/Consultants to Learn About Present Status of Tucson Tail and Campsite

Lesson 3: Using Technology To Put De Anza To Poetry in Spanish

Lesson 4: Using Technology To Put De Anza To Music (Corrido ) in Spanish

Lesson 5: Using Scholars/Consultants To Learn More About De Anza-Tumacacori: A Culminating Experience

Lesson Number

Part I-V

Focus of the Lesson

Students will learn about Spanish and history through materials from the Anza trails focusing on Tucson (Arizona) curriculum strands of communication, communities, comparisons, connections, culture, economics, and geography.

Objectives

A. Content objectives:
  1. To Think critically about language of the historical trails of Juan Bautista de Anza with primary sources journals, diaries, and letters.
  2. To study Anza trails using Web de Anza resources to focus on history, communication, communities, comparisons, connections, economics, and geography of the Anza era.

B. Language and Social Studies objectives:

  1. To learn and compare vocabulary used in Anza's time.
  2. To research primary and secondary sources on Anza trails, with emphasis on on economics and geography
  3. To present an oral, visual and written report on Anza trails.

C. Learning Strategy objectives:

  1. Individual thinking and writing about a trip taken.
  2. Brainstorm in groups about what Anza's trips must have been like.
  3. Comparison of student personal trip in group discussion.
  4. Predict, as a class, what problems those originally on historic Anza trails must have experienced.
  5. Read Anza's materials in groups to report to class.
  6. Students choose specific research they want to work on as their project after reading Web de Anza resources.
  7. Students learn to use new computer technologies.

 

Projected Time Needed

 

Materials/Technology Needed

  1. Computers
  2. Web de Anza Internet access
  3. Scanner
  4. Hyperstudio or PowerPoint software
  5. Camera and film or digital camera
  6. Projection system for computer
  7. Projection screen
  8. Library

Use of Web de Anza

Lesson 1: Using Technology To Learn About The Anza Expedition. Students were very excited using Web de Anza technology resources to find evidence of important history, i.e. Anza expeditions, in their own community of Tucson, Arizona.

Lesson 2: Using Scholars/Consultants to Learn About Present Status of Tucson Tail and Campsite. Students were delighted to hear from a scholar/consultant about the amount of important historical details of the Anza expeditions in their own community of Tucson.

Lesson 3: Using Technology To Put De Anza To Poetry in Spanish. At first students were at a loss to tell what they learned about the Anza expedition in a poem. Working individually first with word processing and later with a teacher guided discussion, a viable poem emerged from group contribution and consensus.

Lesson 4: Using Technology To Put De Anza To Music (Corrido ) in Spanish. Similar experience as Lesson 3 for students using Web de Anza.

Lesson 5: Using Scholars/Consultants To Learn More About De Anza-Tumacacori: A Culminating Experience Living history at Tumacacori. Students met Anza himself, role played by Don Garate. Students said they liked this Anza role playing a great deal as it made them feel they were in Anza's time frame in the historical context of place.

 

Use of Scholars-Consultants (optional)

See Lesson 2 and Lesson 5.

 

Teacher Activities

Lesson 1: Using Technology To Learn About The Anza Expedition. Students are presented with the problem of "how do they prepare for going on a long trip". Such concerns as what transportation is required, what anticipated difficulties of such a journey could they expect? Next, students are asked to discuss in small groups, what it would be like to go on a long trip in 1775-76. Student groups make list and compared them in a following overall class discussion. The whole class discussion of the small groups brainstorming brings students into more specific focus of of what they would do for water, food, sanitation, medical problems, danger from indigenous people, campsite concerns, e.g. snakes, climate issues of rain and temperature. With these parameters in mind students spend two class days finding all available print resources on topics related to the small group concerns and later class discussion on taking a trip in 1775-76 western North America. Following, students spend two days researching on line, i.e. Web de Anza, all the information, English and Spanish, they find on this topic to write a group report, using word processing software. Completed reports are then presented to class.

Lesson 2: Using Scholars/Consultants to Learn About Present Status of Tucson Tail and Campsite. Have a local scholar visit students, such as Mr. Michael Weber of the Tucson area in Arizona, to inform students about the present status of the Tucson de Anza trail and campsite and how the local geographic environment was part of the Anza expedition experience.

Lesson 3: Using Technology To Put De Anza To Poetry in Spanish. Students were asked to write an original poem about Anza using word processing. Lessons 1-2 provide important background for student to consider poem content and initial inspiration ideas to begin a poem.

Lesson 4: Using Technology To Put De Anza To Music (Corrido ) in Spanish.Working with a music teacher, the concept of corrido as a form of ballad is presented to students such as:

"... a narrative in the first or third person that usually flows from beginning to end from the lips of an eyewitness or well-informed narrator. The corrido is a means by which the common people (el pueblo) documents, interprets and disseminates experiences of significant meaning. Today the corrido is enjoyed throughout Mexico, the American Southwest, and other parts of the Spanish-speaking world. It continues to be a popular form of oral and written expression among Mexicans and Mexican Americans, and one can find corridos about almost any subject matter." (from Celestino Fernandez, The Mexican Corrido, University of Arizona)

After reviewing examples of corridos with a class, students are asked to write their own corrido beginning first with their individual ideas as to facts, events, details should be included in their corrido. Working in groups, students sift through ideas and narrow them down to favorites. Coming together as a class, corridos can be shared from groups and an overall class corrido can be created.

Lesson 5: Using Scholars/Consultants To Learn More About De Anza-Tumacacori: A Culminating Experience Living history at Tumacacori. Students can go on a day long field trip to Tumacacori, Arizona and visit Tumacácori National Historical Park, located in the Santa Cruz River Valley in southern Arizona, is the site of one of the oldest Spanish missions in the Southwest. The 45-acre park consists of three distinct units: Tumacácori, Guevavi, and Calabazas. All visitor services and park operations are based out of the Tumacácori unit. Students can experience the park as an example of living history if someone can play the role of Anza and meet them on the grounds to present important historical information about Anza's experiences as well as those of local indigenous people such as the Apaches.

Student Activities

See Teacher Activities (above)

Evaluation of Student Learning

 

Evaluation of Lesson

The lessons works well as an interdisciplinary curriculum experience for students in history, geography, literature, poetry, music, and drama (role playing at Tumacacori). Teachers can meet local district curriculum requirements that reflect national standards. (See below). These lessons take more time than one usually anticipates. Lesson 1 alone was a week of class time. It would be helpful to have more background on diary writing such as Anza and other historical figures engaged in related to traveling in unknown territory and conventions of writing about such travels. ß

 

Content Standards (Note: Links below go to listed National Council for the Social Studies curriculum standard reflected in this lesson ).

Culture I-(a) (b) (c)

Time, Continuity, and Change II- (a) (b) (d) (e) (f)

People, Places, and Environment III-(a)(b) (f) (i)

Individual Development and Identity IV-(a) (b) (e) (g) (h)

Individuals, Groups, and Institutions V-(b) (c) (f) (g)

Global Connections IX-(a) (b)

Other

 

 


Web de Anza On-Line Learning Community
Center for Advanced Technology In Education
Eugene, Oregon
 
Home Page
 
Phil Kessinger
Content Coordinator
November 27, 2000
 
emc@pond.net
 
Note: Web de Anza resources contain an extensive collection of primary and secondary historical sources on the Spanish Colonial era of Juan Bautistia de Anza in North America, 1750-1800. We encourage you to visit the main Web de Anza site at http://anza.uoregon.edu and explore.