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Working With National Standards


 

 

National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS): Executive Summary Curriculum Content Standards


1. Culture

2. Time, Continuity, and Change

3. People, Places, and Environment

4. Individual Development and Identity

5. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

6. Power, Authority, and Governance

7. Production, Distribution, and Consumption

8. Science, Technology, and Society

9. Global Connections

10. Civic Ideals and Practices

 

Note: Follow links below to lesson plans created by Web de Anza teachers related to the identified NCSS curriculum standard.


1. Culture 

The study of culture prepares students to answer questions such as: What are the common characteristics of different cultures? How do belief systems, such as religion or political ideals, influence other parts of the culture? How does the culture change to accommodate different ideas and beliefs? What does language tell us about the culture? In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with geography, history, sociology, and anthropology, as well as multicultural topics across the curriculum.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and culture diversity, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. explore and describe similarities and differences in the ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns;

b. give examples of how experiences may be interpreted differently by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference;

c. describe ways in which language, stories, folktales, music, and artistic creations serve as expressions of culture and influence behavior of people living in a particular culture;

d. compare ways in which people from different cultures think about and deal with their physical environment and social conditions;

e. give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups.

Middle Grades

a. compare similarities and differences in the ways groups, societies, and cultures meet human needs and concerns;

b. explain how, information and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference;

c. explain and give examples of how language, literature, the arts, architecture, other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture;

d. explain why individuals and groups respond differently to their physical and social environments and or changes to them on the basis of shared assumptions, values, and beliefs;

e. articulate the implications of cultural diversity as well as cohesion, within and across groups.

High School

a. analyze and explain the ways groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns; (Estrada-Weber)

b. predict how data and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

c. apply an understanding of culture as an integrated whole that explains the functions and interactions of language, literature, the arts, traditions, beliefs and values, and behavior patterns; (Estrada-Weber)

d. apply an understanding of culture as an integrated whole that explains the functions and interactions of language, literature, the arts, traditions, beliefs and values, and behavior patterns;

e. demonstrate the value of cultural diversity, as well as cohesion, within and across groups;

f. interpret patterns of behavior reflecting values and attitudes that contribute or pose obstacles to cross-cultural understanding;

g.construct reasoned judgments about specific cultural responses to persistent human issues;

h.explain and apply ideas, theories, and modes of in inquiry drawn from anthropology and sociology in the examination of persistent issues and social problems.

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2. Time, Continuity, and Change 

Human beings seek to understand their historical roots and to locate themselves in time. Knowing how to read and reconstruct the past allows one to develop a historical perspective and to answer questions such as: Who am I? What happened in the past? How am I connected to those in the past? How has the world changed and how might it change in the future? Why does our personal sense of relatedness to the past change? This theme typically appears in courses in history and others that draw upon historical knowledge and habits.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. demonstrate an understanding that different people may describe the same event or situation in diverse ways, citing reasons for the differences in views;

b. demonstrate an ability to use correctly vocabulary associated with time such as past, present, future, and long ago; read and construct simple timelines; identify examples of change; and recognize examples of cause and effect relationships;

c. compare and contrast different stones or accounts about past events, people, places, or situations, identifying how they contribute to our understanding of the past;

d. identify and use various sources for reconstructing the past, such as documents, letters, diaries, maps, textbooks, photos, and others;e. demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently;

e. demonstrate an understanding that people in different times and places view the world differently;

f. use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with elements of historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about and action-taking on public issues.

Middle Grades

a. demonstrate an understanding that different scholars may describe the same event or situation in different ways but must provide reasons or evidence for their views;

b. identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity;

c. identify and describe selected historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, such as the rise of civilizations, the development of transportation systems, the growth and breakdown of colonial systems, and others;

d. identify and use processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past, such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating, and weighing evidence for claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality;

e. develop critical sensitivities such as empathy and skepticism regarding attitudes, values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts;

f. use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about and action-taking on public issues.

High School

a. demonstrate that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use; (Estrada-Weber)

b. apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity; (Estrada-Weber)

c. identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, such as the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions;

d. systematically employ processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and reinterpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, and searching for causality; (Capes) (Yank) (Estrada-Weber)

e. investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgement; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

f. apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues. (Estrada-Weber)

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3- People, Places, & Environment

The study of people, places, and human-environment interactions assists students as they create their spatial views and geographic perspectives of the world beyond their personal locations. Students need the knowledge, skills, and understanding to answer questions such as: Where are things located? Why are they located where they are? What do we mean by "region"? How do landforms change? What implications do these changes have for people? In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with area studies and geography.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. construct and use mental maps of locales, regions, and the world that demonstrate understanding of relative location, direction, size, and shape;

b. interpret, use, and distinguish various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes, and photographs;

c. use appropriate resources, data sources, and geographic tools such as atlases, data bases, grid systems, charts, graphs, and maps to generate, manipulate, and interpret information;

d. estimate distance and calculate scale;

e. locate and distinguish among varying landforms and geographic features, such as mountains, plateaus, islands, and oceans;

f. describe and speculate about physical system changes, such as seasons, climate and weather, and the water cycle;

g. describe how people create places that reflect ideas, personality, culture, and wants and needs as they design homes, playgrounds, classrooms, and the like;

h. examine the interaction of human beings and their physical environment, the use of land, building of cities, and ecosystem changes in selected locales and regions;

i. explore ways that the earth's physical features have changed over time in the local region and beyond and how these changes may be connected to one another;

j. observe and speculate about social and economic effects of environ-mental changes and crises resulting from phenomena such as floods, storms, and drought;

k. consider existing uses and propose and evaluate alternative uses of resources and land in home, school, community, the region, and beyond.

Middle Grades

a. elaborate mental maps of locales, regions, and the world that demonstrate understanding of relative location, direction, size, and shape;

b. create, interpret, use, and distinguish various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes, and photographs;

c. use appropriate resources, data sources, and geographic tools such as aerial photographs, satellite images, geographic information systems (GIS), map projections, and cartography to generate, manipulate, and interpret information such as atlases, data bases, grid systems, charts, graphs, and maps;

d. estimate distance, calculate scale, and distinguish other geographic relationships such as population density and spatial distribution patterns;

e. locate and describe varying landforms and geographic features, such as mountains, plateaus, islands, rain forests, deserts, and oceans, and explain their relationships within the ecosystem;

f. describe physical system changes such as seasons, climate and weather, and the water cycle and identify geographic patterns associated with them;

g. describe how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they build neighborhoods, parks, shopping centers, and the like;

h. examine, interpret, and analyze physical and cultural patterns and their interactions, such as land use, settlement patterns, cultural transmission of customs and ideas, and ecosystem changes;

i. describe ways that historical events have been influenced by, and have influenced, physical and human geographic factors in local, regional, national, and global settings;

j. observe and speculate about social and economic effects of environ-mental changes and crises resulting from phenomena such as floods, storms, and drought;

k. propose, compare, and evaluate alternative uses of land and resources in communities, regions, nations, and the world.

High School

a. refine mental maps of locales, regions, and the world that demonstrate understanding of relative location, direction, size, and shape; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

b. create, interpret, use, and synthesize information from various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes, and photographs; (Capes) (Yank) (Estrada-Weber)

c. use appropriate resources, data sources, and geographic tools such as aerial photographs, satellite Images, geographic information systems (GIS), map projections, and cartography to generate, manipulate, and interpret information such as atlases, data bases, grid systems, charts, graphs, and maps;

d.calculate distance, scales, area, and density, and distinguish spatial distribution patterns;

e. describe, differentiate, and explain the relationships among various regional and global patterns of geographic phenomena such as landforms, sods, climate, vegetation, natural resources, and population;

f. use knowledge of physical system changes such as seasons, climate and weather, and the water cycle to explain geographic phenomena; (Estrada-Weber)

g. describe compare how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, government policy, and current values and ideals as they design and build specialized buildings, neighborhoods, shopping centers, urban centers, industrial parks, and the like;

h. examine, interpret, and analyze physical and cultural patterns and their interactions, such as land use, settlement patterns, cultural transmission of customs and ideas, and ecosystem changes; (Capes) (Yank)

i. describe and assess ways that historical events have been influenced by, and have influenced, physical and human geographic factors in local, regional, national, and global settings; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

j. analyze and evaluate social and economic effects of environmental changes and crises resulting from phenomena such as floods, storms, and drought;

k. propose, compare, and evaluate alternative policies for the use of land and other resources in communities, regions, nations, and the world.

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4. Individual Development and Identity

Personal identity is shaped by one's culture, by groups, and by institutional influences. Students should consider such questions as: How do people learn? Why do people behave as they do? What influences how people learn, perceive, and grow? How do people meet their basic needs in a variety of contexts? How do individuals develop from youth to adulthood? In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with psychology and anthropology.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. describe personal changes over time, such as those rdated to physical development and personal interests;

b. describe personal connections to place&emdash;especially place as associated with immediate surroundings;

c. describe the unique features of one's nuclear and extended families;

d. show how learning and physical development affect behavior;

e. identify and describe ways family, groups, and community influence the individual's daily life and personal choices;

f. explore factors that contribute to one s personal identity such as interests, capabilities, and perceptions;

g. analyze a particular event to identify reasons individuals might respond to it in different ways;

h. work independently and cooperatively to accomplish goals.

Middle Grades

a. relate personal changes to social, cultural, and historical contexts;

b. describe personal connections to place&emdash;as associated with commu-nity, nation, and world;

c. describe the ways family, gender, ethnicity, nationality, and insti-tutional affiliations contribute to personal identity;

d. relate such factors as physical endowment and capabilities, learning, motivation, personality, perception, and behavior to individual development;

e. identify and describe ways region-al, ethnic, and national cultures influence individuals' daily lives;

f. identify and describe the influence of perception, attitudes, values, and beliefs on personal identity;

g. identify and interpret examples of stereotyping, conformity, and altruism;

h. work independently and cooperatively to accomplish goals.

High School

a. articulate personal connections to time, place, and social/cultural systems; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

b. identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individual's daily life; (Estrada-Weber)

c. describe the ways family, religion, gender, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, and other group and cultural influences contribute to the development of a sense of self;

d. apply concepts, methods, and theories about the study of human growth and development, such as physical endowment, learning, motivation, behavior, perception, and personality;

e. examine the interactions of ethnic, national, or cultural influences in specific situations or events; (Estrada-Weber)

f. analyze the role of perceptions, attitudes, values, and beliefs in the development of personal identity;

g. compare and evaluate the impact of stereotyping, conformity, acts of altruism, and other behaviors on individuals and groups; (Estrada-Weber)

h. work independently and cooperatively within groups and institutions to accomplish goals; (Capes) (Yank) (Estrada-Weber)

i. examine factors that contribute to and damage one's mental health and analyze issues related to mental health and behavioral disorders in contemporary society.

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5. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions 

Institutions such as schools, churches, families, government agencies, and the courts play an integral role in people's lives. It is important that students learn how institutions are for made, what controls and influences them, how they influence individuals and culture, and how they are maintained or changed. Students may address questions such as: What is the role of institutions in this and other societies? How am I influenced by institutions? How do institutions change? What is my role in institutional change? In schools this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science, and history.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups and institutions so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. identify roles as learned behavior patterns in group situations such as student, family member, peer play group member, or club member;

b. give examples of and a plain group and institutional influences such as religious beliefs, laws, and peer pressure, on people, events, and elements of culture;

c. identify examples of institutions and describe the interactions of people with institutions;

d. identify and describe examples of tensions between and among individuals, groups, or institutions, and how belonging to more than one group can cause internal conflicts;

e. identify and describe examples of tension between an individual's beliefs and government policies and laws;

f. give examples of the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change;

g. show how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and promote the common good, and identify examples of where they fail to do so.

Middle Grades

a. demonstrate an understanding of concepts such as role, status, and social class in describing the inter-actions of individuals and social groups;

b. analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of culture;

c. describe the various forms institutions take and the interactions of people with institutions;

d. identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and group or insti-tutional efforts to promote social conformity;

e. identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government policies and laws;

f. describe the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change

g. apply knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and promote the common good.

High School

a. apply concepts such as role, status, and social class in describing the connections and interactions of individuals, groups, and institutions in society,

b. analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of culture in both historical and contemporary settings; (Estrada-Weber)

c. describe the various forms institutions take, and explain how they develop and change over time; (Estrada-Weber)

d. identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and efforts used to promote social conformity by groups and institutions;

e. describe and examine belief systems basic to specific traditions and laws in contemporary and historical movements;

f. evaluate the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change; (Estrada-Weber)

g. analyze the extent to which groups and institutions meet individual needs and promote the common good in contemporary and historical settings; (Estrada-Weber)

h. explain and apply ideas and modes of inquiry drawn from behavioral science and social theory in the examination of persistent issues and social problems. (Capes) (Yank)

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6. Power, Authority, and Governance

Understanding the historical development of structures of power, authority, and governance and their evolving functions in contemporary U.S. society and other parts of the world is essential for developing civic competence. In exploring this theme, students confront questions such as: What is power? What forms does it take? Who holds it? How is it gained, used, and justified? What is legitimate authority? How are governments created, structured, maintained, and changed? How can individual rights be protected within the context of majority rule? In schools, this theme typicallyappears in units and courses dealing with government, politics, political science, history, law, and other social sciences.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. examine the rights and responsibilities of the individual in relation to his or her social group, such as family, peer group, and school class;

b. explain the purpose of government;

c. give examples of how government does or does not provide for needs and wants of people, establish order and security, and manage conflict;

d. recognize how groups and organizations encourage unity and deal with diversity to maintain order and security;

e. distinguish among local, state, and national government and identify representative leaders at these levels such as mayor, governor, and president;

f. identify and describe factors that contribute to cooperation and cause disputes within and among groups.

g. explore the role of technology in communications, transportation, information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or helps resolve conflicts;

h. recognize and give examples of the tensions between the wants and needs of individuals and groups, and concepts such as fairness, equity, and justice.

Middle Grades

a. examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare;

b. describe the purpose of government how its powers are acquired, used, and justified;

c. analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security;

d. describe the ways nations and organizations respond to forces of unity and diversity affecting order and security

e. identify and describe the basic features of the political system in the United States, and identify represen-tative leaders from various levels and branches of government;

f. explain conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among nations;

g. describe and analyze the role of technology in communications, transportation, information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or helps resolve conflicts;

h. explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the examination of persistent issues and social problems;

i. give examples and explain how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals at home and abroad.

High School

a. examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare;

b. explain the purpose of government and analyze how its powers are acquired, used, and justified;

c. analyze and explain ideas and mechanisms to meet needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, establish order and security, and balance competing conceptions of a just society;

d. compare and analyze the ways nations and organizations respond to conflicts between forces of unity and forces of diversity; (Capes)

e. compare different political systems (their ideologies, structure, institutions, processes, and political cultures) with that of the United States, and identify representative political leaders from selected historical and contemporary settings;

f. analyze and evaluate conditions, actions, and motivations that con-tribute to conflict and cooperation within and among nations; (Yank)

g. evaluate the role of technology in communications, transportation, information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or helps resolve conflicts;

h. explain and apply ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from political science to the examination of persistent issues and social problems;

i. evaluate the extent to which governments achieve their stated ideals and policies at home and abroad;

j. prepare a public policy paper and present and defend it before an appropriate forum in school or community.

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7. Production, Distribution, and Consumption

Because people have wants that often exceed the resources available to them, a variety of ways have evolved to answer such questions as: What is to be produced? How is production to be organized? How are goods and services to be distributed? What is the most effective allocation of the factors of production (land, labor, capital, and management)? In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with economic concepts and issues.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. give examples that show how scarcity and choice govern our economic decisions;

b. distinguish between needs and wants;

c. identify examples of private and public goods and services;

d. give examples of the various institutions that make up economic systems such as families, workers, banks, labor unions, government agencies, small businesses, and large corporations;

e. describe how we depend upon workers with specialized jobs and the ways in which they contribute to the production and exchange of goods and services;

f. describe the influence of incentives, values, traditions, and habits on economic decisions;

g. explain and demonstrate the role of money in everyday life;

h. describe the relationship of price to supply and demand;

i. use economic concepts such as supply, demand, and price to help events in the community and nation;

j. apply knowledge of economic concepts in developing a response Co a current local economic issue, such as how to reduce the flow of trash into a rapidly filling landfill.

Middle Grades

a. give and explain examples of ways that economic systems structure choices about how goods and services are to be produced and distributed;

b. describe the role that supply and demand, prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system;

c. explain the difference between private and public goods and services;

d. describe a range of examples of the various institutions that make up economic systems such as households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations;

e. describe the role of specialization and exchange in the economic process;

f. explain and illustrate how values and beliefs influence different economic decisions;

g. differentiate among various forms of exchange and money;

h. compare basic economic systems according to who determines what is produced, distributed, and consumed;

i. use economic concepts to help explain historical and current developments and issues in local, national, or global contexts;

j. use economic reasoning to compare different proposals for dealing with a contemporary social issue such as unemployment, acid rain, or high quality education.

High School

a. give and explain examples of ways that economic systems structure choices about how goods and services are to be produced and distributed;

b. describe the role that supply and demand, prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system;

c. explain the difference between private and public goods and services;

d. describe a range of examples of the various institutions that make up economic systems such as households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations;

e. describe the role of specialization and exchange in the economic process;

f. explain and illustrate how values and beliefs influence different economic decisions;

g. differentiate among various forms of exchange and money;

h. compare basic economic systems according to who determines what is produced, distributed, and consumed;

i. distinguish between the domestic and global economic systems, and explain how the two interact;

j. apply knowledge of production, distribution, and consumption in the analysis of a public issue such as the allocation of health care or the consumption of energy, and devise an economic plan for accomplishing a socially desirable outcome related to that issue.

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8. Science, Technology, and Society

Modern life as we know it would be impossible without technology and the science that supports it. But technology brings with it many questions: Is new technology always better than old? What can we learn from the past about how new technologies result in broader social change, some of which is unanticipated? How can we cope with the ever-increasing pace of change? How can we manage technology so that the greatest number of people benefit from it? How can we preserve our fundamental values and beliefs in the midst of technological change? This theme draws upon the natural and physical sciences, social sciences, and the humanities, and appears in a variety of social studies courses, including history, geography, economics, civics, and government.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of relationships among science, technology and society, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. identify and describe examples in which science and technology have changed the lives of people, such as in homemaking, childcare, work, transportation, and communication;

b. identify and describe examples in which science and technology have led to changes in the physical environment, such as the building of dams and levees, offshore oil drilling, medicine from rain forests, and loss of rain forests due to extraction of resources or alternative uses;

c. describe instances in which changes in values, beliefs, and attitudes have resulted from new scientific and technological knowledge, such as conservation of resources and awareness of chemicals harmful to life and the environment;

d. identify examples of laws and policies that govern scientific and technological applications, such as the Endangered Species Act and environmental protection policies;

e. suggest ways to monitor science and technology in order to protect the physical environment, individual rights, and the common good.

Middle Grades

a. examine and describe the influence of culture on scientific and technological choices and advance-ment, such as in transportation, medicine, and warfare;

b. show through specific examples how science and technology have changed people's perceptions of the social and natural world, such as in their relationship to the land, animal life, family life, and economic needs, wants, and security;

c. describe examples in which values, beliefs, and attitudes have been influenced by new scientific and technological knowledge, such as the invention of the printing press, conceptions of the universe, applications of atomic energy, and genetic discoveries;

d. explain the need for laws and policies to govern scientific and technological applications, such as in the safety and well-being of workers and consumers and the regulation of utilities, radio, and television;

e. seek reasonable and ethical solutions to problems that arise when scientific advancements and social norms or values come into conflict.

High School

a. identify and describe both current and historical examples of the interaction and interdependence of science, technology, and society in a variety of cultural settings;

b. make judgments about how science and technology have transformed the physical world and human society and our under-standing of time, space, place, and human-environment interactions; (Yank)

c. analyze how science and technology influence the core values, beliefs, and attitudes of society, and how core values, beliefs, and attitudes of society shape scientific and technological change;

d. evaluate various policies that have been proposed as ways of dealing with social changes resulting from new technologies, such as genetically engineered p ants and animals;

e. recognize and interpret varied perspectives about human societies and the physical world using scientific knowledge, ethical standards, and technologies from diverse world cultures; (Yank)

f. formulate strategies and develop policies for influencing public discussions associated with technology-society issues, such as the greenhouse effect.

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9. Global Connections

The realities of global interdependence require understanding the increasingly important and diverse global connections among world societies and the frequent tension between national interests and global priorities. Students will need to be able to address such international issues as health care, the environment, human rights, economic competition and interdependence, age-old ethnic enmities, and political and military alliances. This theme typically appears in units or courses dealing with geography, culture, and economics, but may also draw upon the natural and physical sciences and the humanities.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global connections and interdependence, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. explore ways that language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements may facilitate global understanding or lead to misunder-standing;

b. give examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among individuals, groups, and nations;

c. examine the effects of changing technologies on the global community;

d. explore causes, consequences, and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary, and emerging global issues, such as pollution and endangered species;

e. examine the relationships and tensions between personal wants and needs and various global concerns, such as use of imported oil, land use, and environmental protection;

f. investigate concerns, issues, standards, and conflicts related to universal human rights, such as the treatment of children, religious groups, and effects of war.

Middle Grades

a. describe instances in which language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements can facilitate global understanding or cause misunderstanding;

b. analyze examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, and nations;

c. describe and analyze the effects of changing technologies on the global community;

d. explore the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary, and emerging global issues, such as health, security, resource allocation, economic development, and environmental quality;

e. describe and explain the relationships and tensions between national sovereignty and global interests, in such matters as territory, natural resources, trade, use of technology, and welfare of people;

f. demonstrate understanding of concerns, standards, issues, and conflicts related to universal human rights;

g. identify and describer the roles of international and multinational organizations.

High School

a. explain how language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements can facilitate global under-standing or cause misunderstanding; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

b. explain conditions and motiva-tions that contribute to conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups. societies. and nations; (Capes) (Estrada-Weber)

c. analyze and evaluate the effects of changing technologies on the global community;

d. analyze the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary, and emerging global issues, such as health, security, resource allocation, economic development, and environmental quality;

e. analyze the relationships and tensions between nation al sovereignty and global interests, in such matters as territory, economic development, nuclear and other weapons, use of natural resources, and human rights concerns;

f. analyze or formulate policy statements demonstrating an understanding of concerns, standards, issues, and conflicts related to universal human rights;

g. identify and describe the roles of international and multinational organizations.

h. illustrate how individual behaviors and decisions connect with global systems.

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10. Civic Ideals and Practices

An understanding of civic ideals and practices of citizenship is critical to full participation in society and is a central purpose of the socialstudies. Students confront such questions as: What is civic participation and how can I be involved? How has the meaning of citizenship evolved? What is the balance between rights and responsibilities? What is the role of the citizen in the community and the nation, and as a member of the world community? How can I make a positive difference? In schools, this theme typically appears in units or courses dealing with history, political science, cultural anthropology, and fields such as global studies, law-related education, and the humanities.

Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:

Early Grades

a. identify key ideals of the United States' democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law, and discuss their application in specific situations;

b. identify examples of rights and responsibilities of citizens;

c. locate, access, organize, and apply information about an issue of public concern from multiple points of view;

d. identify and practice selected forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic;

e. a plain actions citizens can take to influence public policy decisions;

f. recognize that a variety of formal and in formal actors influence and shape public policy;

g. examine the influence of public opinion on personal decision-making and government policy on public issues;

h. explain how public policies and citizen behaviors may or may not reflect the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government;

i. describe how public policies are used to address issues of public concern;

j. recognize and interpret how the "common good" can be strengthened through various forms of citizen action.

Middle Grades

a. examine the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law;

b. identify and interpret sources and examples of the rights and responsibilities of citizens;

c. locate, access, analyze, organize, and apply information about selected public issues&emdash;recognizing and explaining multiple points of view;

d. practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic;

e. explain and analyze various forms of citizen action that influence public policy decisions;

f. identify and explain the roles of formal and informal political actors in influencing and shaping public policy and decision-making;

g. analyze the influence of diverse forms of public opinion on the development of public policy and decision-making;

h. analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government;

i. explain the relationship between policy statements and action plans used to address issues of public concern;

j. examine strategies designed to strengthen the "common good," which consider a range of options for citizen action.

High School

a. explain the orgins and interpret the continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law;

b. identify, analyze, interpret, and evaluate sources and examples of citizens' rights and responsibilities;

c. locate, access, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply infor-mation about selected public issues

&emdash;identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view;

d. practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic;

e. analyze and evaluate the influence of various forms of citizen action on public policy,

f. analyze a variety of public policies and issues from the perspective of formal and informal political actors;

g. evaluate the effectiveness of public opinion in influencing and shaping public policy development an d decision-making;

h. evaluate the degree to which public policies and citizen behaviors reflect or foster the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government;

i. construct a policy statement and an action plan to achieve one or more goals related to an issue of public concern;

j. participate in activities to strengthen the "common good," based upon careful evaluation of possible options for citizen action.

 

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 National Council for the Social Studies: Executive Summary Curriculum Content Standards  
Web de Anza On-Line Learning Community
Center for Advanced Technology In Education
Eugene, Oregon
 
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Phil Kessinger
Content Coordinator
November 28, 2000
emc@pond.net

 

Note: Web de Anza resources contain an extensive collection of primary and secondary historical sources on the Spanish Colonial era of Juan Bautistia de Anza in North America, 1750-1800. We encourage you to visit the main Web de Anza site at http://anza.uoregon.edu and explore.